HOW TO ENGAGE NURSES IN INNOVATION

There are currently four million nurses in the U.S. (ANA, 2018). There are four times as many nurses as physicians and eight times as many nurses as pharmacists. Yet often we find that physicians or pharmacists are the “go to” when the tech industry needs input on new products. Generally, it is the physician that is sought out to provide clinical feedback and even provide input into the clinical workflows. Nurses should participate more frequently with tech companies in the design and development stages of new products, however they are often not asked.


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8 ways smartphones are being used as medical devices

Smartphones are quickly gaining the capabilities to make patients’ homes an extension of physicians’ offices, facilitating access to timely medical care. Technological advancements in the phones are enabling them to take higher-resolution photos and deliver better sound quality, suggests Christy Marks-Davis, senior director of marketing for CareCentrix, a company that works with providers and payers to support care of patients in their homes.

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New Non-Profit Aims to Develop Digital Medicine Research, Standards

The Boston-based Digital Medicine Society (DiMe) has attracted a strong array of telehealth and mHealth executives as it moves to define digital medicine and create evidence-based standards.

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How Technology is Addressing SDOH

Social determinants of health (SDOH) has become one of the biggest buzzwords in healthcare. In the quest to provide more complete care—and lower healthcare costs—stakeholders across the healthcare industry, are realizing that treating a patient doesn’t have to begin or end in a hospital.

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Healthcare plays catch-up on adopting disruptive technologies

Big data has been making waves across the entire business sector and almost entirely transforming the way things operate. Construction and development, information security, retail, entertainment and e-commerce have all been changed irrevocably by big data, management and cloud computing technologies. However, healthcare has been slow to adopt these innovative solutions.

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Part 4: Healthcare in the Age of Interoperability

Clinical Decision Support (CDS) is an early, important, and particularly interesting domain within health informatics. Its purpose is to provide clinicians, patients, and others with knowledge and personalized information, intelligently filtered or presented at appropriate times, to enhance health and health care. It is a critical component of the IOM’s vision of a Learning Health System that we introduced in the first article since it is the vehicle for feeding knowledge obtained from the care of prior patients back to providers caring for current patients or even directly to those patients.

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Part 3: Healthcare in the Age of Interoperability

A universal health app platform to support informatics-based innovations in care delivery, no matter what the underlying EMR, was a long-held goal of the academic health informatics community. In 2010, the federal government awarded U.S. $15 million to the Boston Children’s Hospital Computational Health Informatics Program and the Harvard Medical School Department of Biomedical Informatics to create and initially develop just such an app platform.

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