NightWare Won’t Sleep Until PTSD Victims Dream Nightmare-Free

NightWare, a Minneapolis-based medical-device startup, is creating an Apple Watch app for those suffering from nightmare disorder, a common side affect for those suffering from post traumatic stress disorder.

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Instagram is now using AI to describe photos for users with visual impairments

Instagram announced today that it’s rolling out new features that will make the app easier to use for people with visual impairments. The changes will allow screen readers to describe photos, either automatically using AI or by reading custom descriptions added by users.

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Fitbit, Apple Watch could bring new era of health monitoring

Mike Glenn thought something was wrong with his Fitbit. The 34-year-old was camping in Wyoming in May when he started having trouble breathing. He felt fine overall, but his left shoulder began to ache and he broke out in a sweat. "It's probably just a chest cold," Glenn thought.

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Alphabet's Verily Halts Diabetes-Detecting Contact Lens Project

Alphabet Inc.’s experimental medical technology unit Verily halted one of its longest-running projects on Friday: the development of a contact lens that measures glucose levels of people with diabetes.

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Apple Watch Heart Study With Stanford Signs Up 400,000 People

More than 400,000 people have signed up for a Stanford University study being sponsored by Apple Inc. to examine whether Apple Watch can detect patients with undiagnosed heart rhythm problems, one of the largest heart screening studies ever to be conducted.

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Braille for a New Digital Age

When she was a graduate student in her native Bulgaria about five years ago, Kristina Tsvetanova was once asked to help a blind friend sign up online for a class. Understanding why he could not do so opened her eyes to the lag in technological innovation to benefit blind and visually impaired people.

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Microsoft's Nadella Says AI Can make the World More Inclusive

Talk of articial intelligence often leads to speculation about how machines may displace workers. Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella thinks we should talk more about how AI algorithms can expand the workforce now—by helping people with disabilities.

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How to Find Google's New Built-In Breathing Exercise

The TechWatch editors have selected this news item because it is analogous to our LiveWell development project BreatheWell Wear.   We hope you can try out both BreatheWell Wear and Google's web-based breathing exercise.

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Xbox Adaptive Controller to Improve the Gaming Experience for People with Disabilities

This September, Xbox will release a new video game controller that has been developed intentionally for people with limited mobility. For those with physical impairments, the standard controllers that come with an Xbox can be impossible to use. Because of this, Xbox has designed a controller that includes ports for a multitude of other devices such as switches, specially made joy sticks, and foot controllers. They advertise that the adaptive controller will include “"Nineteen 3.5mm ports and two USB 2.0 ports for external inputs. One 3.5mm stereo headset jack for audio." Xbox is also selling other accessories such as wheelchair mounts and leg mounts. 

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Congressional Record Announcement regarding the NIDILRR 40th Anniversary

Mrs. MURRAY. Mr. President, on behalf of millions of people with disabilities, today I wish to celebrate the 40th anniversary of the establishment of the National Institute on Disability, Independent Living, and Rehabilitation Research, NIDILRR, and its 40 years of accomplishments and contributions to the lives of people with disabilities.

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Army enrolling volunteer units to test in-development automated triage tech

The US Army’s medical division has been building a mobile technology platform that will streamline triage and communications in the event of medical evacuations. The Medical Hands-free Unified Broadcast, or MEDHUB, initiative looks to leverage wearable sensors, accelerometers, and other FDA-cleared technology as a means for medics to more easily communicate with teams at a receiving field hospital during an emergency situation.

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Microsoft Xbox Adaptive Controller first look: A new, necessary gamepad

The Xbox Adaptive Controller is the first of its kind. It's a plug-and-play option for people with disabilities -- it connects to the Xbox One or a Windows 10 PC via Bluetooth, and powers on just like the Elite. The controller itself is a clean white rectangle, about 11 inches long and 6 inches wide, with two large black buttons on its face. The buttons aren't touchpads, but they are light-touch enabled, clicking down with the softest of taps so players can roll their palm between the two or otherwise click them without exerting much force. Each button makes a slightly different noise as well, offering an extra layer of sensory input.

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Xbox: Accessible games can “mean the difference between existing and living” for disabled people

Microsoft continues to position itself as a paragon for inclusivity - but it's also keen to get more developers, publishers and platform holders involved in the conversation.

The firm gained a great deal of attention earlier this summer when it announced the Xbox Adaptive Controller, a device that enabled disabled gamers to adapt standard control schemes with a variety of custom inputs suited to their unique circumstances.

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Firefox makers working on voice-controlled web browser called Scout

Mozilla, the organization behind Firefox, is exploring a very different web browser called Scout that's operated by voice rather than keyboard, mouse or touch-screen taps.

The nonprofit revealed the Scout project in an agenda item for an all-hands meeting taking place this week in San Francisco. "With the Scout app, we start to explore browsing and consuming content with voice,"

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